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LIANA PATTIHIS
TO MEND MY BROKEN HEART

OPENING AND ARTIST TALK SATURDAY 24TH OF NOVEMBER 14.00-17.00
ARTIST TALK AT 14.00
OPENING AT 15.00-17.00

THE EXHIBITION RUNS UNTIL 23D OF DECEMBER

We are happy to invite UK based artist Liana Pattihis as the end of the year exhibitor at PLATINA.
The exhibition marks 11 years of creativity, self- expression and fulfilment and contains pieces from different series. Each series has a story to tell, with the completion of each entity in most cases, forming the starting point for the next.
The latest series with the same title as the title of the exhibition, 'to mend my broken heart ', arises from a loved but dropped Japanese Kutani bowl, shattered into many pieces. The bowl was given to Liana Pattihis as a wedding gift and when it was damaged, she was heartbroken.

"I really loved that bowl, so I painstakingly sat and glued each piece together. Though the initial form was there it was now scarred forever. With many tiny pieces missing, it was kept in a cupboard over the years, until one day I had the idea to use chain to mend it. The inspiration came from Kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery." -LP

Chains and enamel are materials that are recognized in Liana Pattihis's Jewelry and she has developed her own unique method of sifting and fusing it on a movable base. The versatility of the materials is what attracts her the most as it gives an organic feel to the work.

"My response to the way in which the materials fuse together is intuitive and impromptu. With each layer the enamel adds form, structure and substance to the piece. The natural fragility of the material exudes a new-found strength, richness in texture and an acquired preciousness at the same time as the silver or gold chain is slowly buried into obscurity. The inquisitive attention, tactile approach and numerous juxtapositions, provoke a sense of preciousness in my jewellery that is understated and enigmatic." -LP


 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Longer text:

'With a background in Interior Design, I studied Jewellery Design under the leadership of Caroline Broadhead, graduating in 2007. This year marks 11 years of creativity, self- expression and fulfilment.

Though not a trained enamellist, I found working with enamel a material that expresses me more than any other. Stretching the boundaries of what can be achieved with enamel as a medium, I have developed my own unique method of sifting and fusing it on a movable base like silver and gold chains. My designs evolve through a dialogue between my source inspiration and the creative potential of the enamel. The versatility of the material is what attracts me the most as it gives an organic feel to my work.

My response to the way in which the materials fuse together is intuitive and impromptu. With each layer the enamel adds form, structure and substance to the piece. The natural fragility of the material exudes a new found strength, richness in texture and an acquired preciousness at the same time as the silver or gold chain is slowly buried into obscurity. The inquisitive attention, tactile approach and numerous juxtapositions, provoke a sense of preciousness in my jewellery that is understated and enigmatic.

My work expresses me, my culture, my strong ties with family and roots. All these have been a constant inspiration and a guide to my creations. Each series has a story to tell, with the completion of each entity in most cases, forming the starting point for the next.

My latest series is titled 'to mend my broken heart '. Collecting has always featured highly in my life. Part of my collection, was a Japanese Kutani bowl, given to me as a wedding present, which, some years after, I dropped shattering it into many pieces. I was heartbroken! I really loved that bowl, so I painstakingly sat and glued each piece together. Though the initial form was there it was now scarred forever. With many tiny pieces missing, it was kept in a cupboard over the years, until one day I had the idea to use chain to mend it. The inspiration came from Kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery.

The homonymous series of the subsequent work created, is based on the idea of replacing the lacquer and powder dust used in the traditional method, with epoxy and silver or gold chain. The aim is to embrace the damaged and the imperfect, by highlighting the cracks and missing pieces with the chain. The mended flaws become part of the design, offering the object a new identity. Healing the scars of the flawed and the unwanted, the object becomes purposeful and desirable yet again. Drawn to the philosophical interpretation of Kintsugi, that the cracks and seams are merely a symbol of an event that happened in the life of the object, rather than the cause of its destruction, the pieces are reborn, granting the object a lease of a new life. Using a selection of unwanted and damaged wedding gifts and objects collected over the years, a collection of curious, wearable pieces and decorative objects is created, whilst giving the original pieces a unique new identity and function.' - LP


 

 

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