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AJF- ART JEWELERY FORUM 2018 ARTIST AWARD

THE WINNER:
BIFEI CAO (CHINA)

THE FINALSITST:
KARIN ROY ANDERSSON (SWEDEN)
CORRINA GOUTOS (US/GERMANY)
AURÉLIE GUILLAUME (CANADA)
JELIZAVETA SUSKA (SWEDEN)

OPENING SATURDAY 17TH OF MARCH 12-15 PM
DURING THE OPENING AT 1 PM, INGER WÄSTBERG WILL INTRODUCE THE AJF 2018 ARTIST AWARD

ARTIST TALK BY KARIN ROY ANDERSSON AND JELIZAVETA SUSKA 20TH OF MARCH 18-19
THE EXHIBITION RUNS UNTIL 28TH OF MARCH

The winner of 2018 AJF Artist Award was announced March 10 during Munich Jewellery Week. Bifei Cao from China has been awarded the unrestricted cash prize of $7,500, generously funded by Barbara Waldman, Linda Peshkin, Marion Fulk, Edie Nadler and Susan Kempin.

The five finalists were chosen from 121 artists representing 33 countries and judged on originality, depth of concept, continuity of design, and quality of craftsmanship. This year's jurors were the Susan Cohn (Australia), Inger Wästberg (Sweden), and Lynn Batchelder (US).

The Artist Talk is supported by Stockholms stad


Link to AJF - Art Jewelry Forum

 




The winner Bifei Cao (China)

Hollowware and making jewelry-based objects have characterized my artistic practice. I employ techniques and strategies to present a series of narrative art pieces that explore how the negotiation with different cultures can be reinterpreted in a visual form through object making. Through practice and research, I have drawn from my childhood memories of traditional Chinese visual culture and the exploration of personal identity through a shifting life experience of living in a variety of multicultural environments.

 



Karin Roy Andersson (Sweden)

The urge to repeat movements is significant for my personality and work; multiplicity attracts me. Variations between details become important, creating patterns and rhythms. My aim is to make jewelry where dynamic patterns form balance. To me, jewelry is communication. The intimate connection to the body opens for a special relation to the receiver and the wearer's impact on the object is inevitable and intriguing.




Corrina Goutos (US/Germany)

Self-Made is the remnants of Generation Z's search for permanence in an attention deficit disorder society. Also known as the Selfie Generation, Zs have mastered the catered image of self. They design the face they will present to the world and build a platform on which to receive praise and deflect criticism. Self-Made is an archetype of a souvenir; it turns rather insignificant human experiences into tangible objects. Unlike the fragile digital façade, this version is #nofilter




Aurélie Guillaume (Canada)

Through cartooning, I am able to translate deeply intimate moments of sorrow, joy, love, frustration, and other emotions into an image that viewers can identify with, and laugh at. My cartoons use hyperbole to exaggerate the whimsical, the grotesque and even macabre nature of the world around me. I believe in the importance of finding humor in tragedy, just as I feel that we can find beauty in ugliness.




Jelizaveta Suska (Sweden)

The Frozen in Amber pieces are a lot about the feeling of a moment in time. I was looking for materialization of this abstract matter. After a period of research, I came up with my own material, which has two main compounds: polymer, which is light and transparent, just like “a moment,” and crushed amber, which creates an illusion of a solid stone. In the beginning of crafting each piece, the material is hot and dynamic, but in a while it turns still. Like a metaphor of a moment becoming a memory.


 

 

 

 

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